Colorectal Cancer – FAQs

Colorectal Cancer: FAQs

Orange County Radiation Therapy & Cancer Treatment Center

Whether you’ve been told you may have a precancerous colon polyp, have been diagnosed with colorectal cancer, or have a diagnosis for any other cancerous condition, OC CyberKnife is committed to helping you heal and thrive. As a world-class cancer center serving the Orange County area, we work with our patients to design comprehensive cancer treatment plans that work with each patient’s lifestyle, prioritizing noninvasive treatments like CyberKnife whenever possible. We believe that patient education is a vital part of the cancer treatment process, which is why we’ve composed a list of frequently asked questions about colorectal cancer along with their answers.

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If you or a loved one have been affected by colorectal cancer, we understand how difficult and scary this can be – but no matter what your situation, OC CyberKnife is on your side. As one of Orange County’s leading cancer treatment centers, we have the state-of-the-art technologies and cancer treatments to give you the best possible chance at beating cancer and reclaiming a healthy normal life. So don’t wait – call OC CyberKnife today at 714.962.7100 to schedule your treatment consultation. We’ll help you reclaim the normal, healthy life you deserve.

Answer :

Colorectal cancer may affect anyone, and it’s both the third most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the third most common cause of cancer death in the US, for both men and women. Each year, 137,000 new cases of colorectal cancer are diagnosed in the US, and of those cases, roughly 50,000 will eventually prove fatal.

Answer :

It’s highly uncommon for young people to develop colorectal cancer if they don’t have a family history of the condition, but there is a hereditary syndrome that may cause a young person to get colorectal cancer. Called Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP), this condition causes a patient to develop anywhere between hundreds and thousands of precancerous polyps in the colon, usually starting the mid-teenage years. Unless the entire colon is surgically removed, the patient is guaranteed to develop colorectal cancer by their late 30s.

Answer :

There’s not very much data as to the link between consuming lactose products, lactose intolerance, and colorectal cancer. That said, some new studies point to probiotic therapy as a healthy treatment, and it’s possible that dietary dairy products alter the microflora of the colon to reduce the risk for colorectal cancer.

Answer :

Generally speaking, no; there is no known correlation between colon length and colorectal cancer risk.

Answer :

No, in most cases, a previous case of stomach cancer does not impact the likelihood of developing colon cancer. There is a rare genetic syndrome called Hereditary NonPolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC), however, that increases the risk of colorectal cancer and gastric cancer at a young age. If you have a strong family history of colorectal and endometrial (uterus) cancer, your cancer doctor may recommend genetic testing for the condition or screenings for colon cancer. You’re generally considered to have a strong family history for a cancerous condition if you have three or more affected relatives, spanning at least two generations, with at least one of the affected relatives having developed the condition before the age of 50.

Answer :

No, IBS has not been shown to affect the risk of colorectal cancer. Generally, people with IBS are recommended to follow the normal screening guidelines for their own demographic. However, if your IBS symptoms change suddenly or you see blood in your stool, you should immediately notify your physician and gastroenterologist to find out if colorectal cancer may be a possibility.